Point Pinos Lighthouse Collection

Rhoderick Dhu wrecked at Moss Beach, Pacific Grove (near Asilomar), Monterey Bay, with rocky shoreline in 3/4 of foreground. Stump in foreground.
Rhoderick Dhu wrecked at Moss Beach, Pacific Grove (near Asilomar), Monterey Bay, with rocky shoreline at high tide. Has "Wreck of the Rodderick Dhu" in photographer's hand on image.
Rhoderick Dhu wrecked at Moss Beach, Pacific Grove (near Asilomar), Monterey Bay, with 47-star flag at left (whose pole is mounted in kelp) foreground. Tent, horse & carriage, and onlookers in foreground. Written on image is: "Oil Boat Roderick Dhu wrecked Moss Beach Apr 26 1909 Pacific Grove Cal."
Rhoderick Dhu wrecked at Moss Beach, Pacific Grove (near Asilomar), Monterey Bay, with 47-star flag at right (whose pole is mounted in kelp) foreground. Horse & carriage, and onlookers in midground. Written on image is: "Wreck of Oil Boat Rhoderick Dhu Monterey Bay Cal."
Rhoderick Dhu wrecked at Moss Beach, Pacific Grove (near Asilomar), Monterey Bay, with boiler, rigging, and two people on shore in foreground.
Three-masted schooner Rhoderick Dhu afloat. This squared-rigged ship is show here without sails. Seven people near bow. Flag hangs from mizzenmast. This steel-hulled ship was built in 1874, later adapted to haul oil by the Associated Oil Company, Captained by Haskins at the time she ran aground (1912) off of Moss Beach in Pacific Grove.
USS Aludra. Named for a star in the constellation of Canis Major, this ship began life in 1944 as a refrigerated cargo ship named the Matchless, operated by the United States Lines. She was reactivated during the Korean conflict and her name changed to Aludra, and was reconfigured to a store ship specializing in underway replenishment. She later participated in Operation "Passage to Freedom," evacuating thousands of Vietnamese refugees after the country was partitioned in 1954. She was decommissioned in September 1969, sold in 1977, and burned & scuttled in 1981. On April 14, 1960, her anchor chains crossed in heavy winds while on the Monterey Bay. Annotation derived from information at: http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/0655.htm, and from: http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/a7/aludra-ii.htm Early index #: 901 Box/CD: 39.2 Orientation: Horizontal
Steam schooner S.S. Tamalpais, which was wrecked on the sandbars & reefs of Moss Landing, Monterey Bay. The incident occurred on March 21, 1931, and she was refloated on March 24, 1931. Image shows ship's stern, lumber in foreground and another boat, perhaps the tug Sea Scout (which pulled her free) in the background. Randall Reinstedt's book, Shipwrecks and Sea Monsters of California's Central Coast identifies this ship as a 574-ton lumber schooner that was loaded with redwood at the time of the mishap. A ship of the same name was renamed YHB-21 and served as a houseboat during WWII http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-xz.htm
Steam schooner S.S. Tamalpais, which was wrecked on the sandbars & reefs of Moss Landing, Monterey Bay. The incident occurred on March 21, 1931, and she was refloated on March 24, 1931. Image shows the starboard side, dark smoke coming from stack, and line extending into water.
Steam schooner S.S. Tamalpais, which was wrecked on the sandbars & reefs of Moss Landing, Monterey Bay. The incident occurred on March 21, 1931, and she was refloated on March 24, 1931. Image is 3/4 view of the ship, with tug boat at left (presumably the Sea Star), with beach, pilings, and discarded lumber in foreground.
Topsail four-masted schooner Aurora, shown low in the water from the port side. She was waterlogged following a storm on Monterey Bay on January 18, 1935 and later stranded on Del Monte Beach. Built in 1901 and owned at the time of her demise by Allen Knight.
Stern of topsail four-masted schooner Aurora, submerged in water among debris. She was disabled during a storm on Monterey Bay on January 18, 1935. She was later stranded on Del Monte Beach. Built in 1901 and owned at the time of her demise by Allen Knight.
Commercial steam schooner S.S. Celia was built in Benicia, CA by Matthew Turner in 1884. She was wrecked in fog off of Point Joe near Pebble Beach on August 28, 1906. Her cargo was lumber. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/celia.html
Steam screw/schooner Gipsy, which plied up and down the Pacific coast hauling freight, including grain & beer. Built in San Francisco in 1868 and owned by the Pacific Coast Steamship Co. She ran aground off Macabee Beach in New Monterey (near Cannery Row) on September 29, 1905 after mistaking a red light marking sewer construction for navigational signal light. View shows ship listing to side near rocks with surf in foreground. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/gipsy.html
Steam schooner S.S. Flavel, which was wrecked after running aground on rocks off of Cypress Point near Pebble Beach on December 14, 1923. This three-masted ship was built in 1917 in Fairhaven, CA, owned by the Hammond Lumber Company, and her Captain was H. Johnson. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/flavel.html
U.S.C.G. cutter Ewing with gash across bow. The accident happened near Moss Landing, near the Highway 1 bridge at Elkhorn Slough. The cutter was entering the area to assist in a ship fire, and struck the bridge. This view shows the cutter passing a cable crossing marker while crewmen stand at bow assessing damage.
U.S.C.G. cutter Ewing in contact with the Highway 1 Bridge, with gash across bow. Onlookers stand on bridge, and small boats in the foreground. The accident happened near Moss Landing, at Elkhorn Slough. The cutter was entering the area to assist in a ship fire, and struck the bridge. This view shows the cutter passing a cable crossing marker while crewmen stand at bow assessing damage.
Close-up of bow of U.S.C.G. cutter Ewing in contact with the Highway 1 Bridge, with gash across bow. Onlookers stand on bridge, and two sailors with cameras prepare to photograph the damage from on board. Damaged bridge pilings in foreground. The accident happened near Moss Landing, at Elkhorn Slough. The cutter was entering the area to assist in a ship fire, and struck the bridge. This view shows the cutter passing a cable crossing marker while crewmen stand at bow assessing damage.
Navy Gunboat PG-1 U.S.S. Yorktown on the Monterey Bay. She was built in Philadelphia, and launched in April 1888. The steel-hulled twin-screw was once part of the "White Squadron" or "Squadron of Evolution." In the 1890s, she guarded herds of seals from Canadian poachers in Arctic waters. She was decommissioned in 1919. http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/09001d.htm
Protected cruiser USS Charleston on the Monterey Bay. This is the third Charleston (C-22), which began service with the Pacific Fleet in December 1906. She was the flagship for Rear Admiral William T. Swinburne, and was in the First Division together with the protected cruisers USS Chicago, USS Milwaukee, USS St. Louis, and the gunboat USS Yorktown. http://freepages.military.rootsweb.com/~cacunithistories/uss%20charleston.html
Steam schooner J.B. Stetson, which ran aground on September 3, 1934 (Labor Day). Built in 1905 in Winslow, WA, she hauled general cargo. Owned by William Gissler, Jr., and captained by F.W. Hubner, she was grounded on rocks near Cypress Point near Pebble Beach under very foggy conditions. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/jbstetson.html
Steam schooner J.B. Stetson, which ran aground on September 3, 1934 (Labor Day). This view shows the ship low in the water, with onlookers (including Otto Plapp looking toward camera and Willard Cary) on rock in foreground. Built in 1905 in Winslow, WA, she hauled general cargo. Owned by William Gissler, Jr., and captained by F.W. Hubner, she was grounded on rocks near Cypress Point near Pebble Beach under very foggy conditions. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/jbstetson.html
Steam schooner J.B. Stetson, which ran aground on September 3, 1934 (Labor Day). This view shows the ship listing, with onlookers on rock in foreground and Robert Johnson in background at sea. Built in 1905 in Winslow, WA, she hauled general cargo. Owned by William Gissler, Jr., and captained by F.W. Hubner, she was grounded on rocks near Cypress Point near Pebble Beach under very foggy conditions. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/jbstetson.html
Steam schooner J.B. Stetson, which ran aground on September 3, 1934 (Labor Day). This view shows the ship still intact, though low in the water, with rocks in foreground. Built in 1905 in Winslow, WA, she hauled general cargo. Owned by William Gissler, Jr., and captained by F.W. Hubner, she was grounded on rocks near Cypress Point near Pebble Beach under very foggy conditions. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/jbstetson.html
Topsail schooner William H. Smith, listing after she broke an anchor chain during a gale on Monterey Bay. Was built in Bath, ME by Goss, Sawyer & Packard. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/wmhsmith.html
The S.S. Frank Buck, which was wrecked at Point Pinos (36 38N / 121 55W), 9:00 p.m., May 3, 1924. This view shows the ship on the rocks near Point Pinos with onlookers on rocks. Another ship is visible behind the Buck. Writing on photo reads: "Tanker F.H. Buck on rocks at Point Pinos Monterey Bay." The Associated Oil Company tanker was empty when it grounded, and was refloated on May 17, 1924. On March 6, 1937, she collided with the President Coolidge in San Francisco Bay, coming to rest near her sister ship, the Lyman Stewart, which had met a similar end on October 7, 1922. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/frankhbuck.html
#921 39.3-921-LB Long #: 39.3-921-LB Negative size: 10" x 8" Negative type: Photo Photographer: Anton Charles Heidrick Copy photo by WM Date: May 3, 1924 Place: Pacific Grove Binder: Ships The S.S. Frank Buck, which was wrecked at Point Pinos, 9:00 p.m., May 3, 1924. This view shows the ship on the rocks near Point Pinos in the background, with cars parked in the midground. The Associated Oil Company tanker was empty when it grounded, and was refloated on May 17, 1924. On March 6, 1937, she collided with the President Coolidge in San Francisco Bay, coming to rest near her sister ship, the Lyman Stewart, which had met a similar end on October 7, 1922. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/frankhbuck.html
The S. S. Frank Buck, wrecked at Point Pinos (36 38N / 121 55W), 9:00 p.m., May 3, 1924. This view shows the port side of the ship afloat, with the shoreline in background. The Associated Oil Company tanker was empty when it grounded, and was refloated on May 17, 1924. On March 6, 1937, she collided with the President Coolidge in San Francisco Bay, coming to rest near her sister ship, the Lyman Stewart, which had met a similar end on October 7, 1922. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/frankhbuck.html
The S.S. Frank Buck. This view shows the ship from the bow near the rocks at Point Pinos, with a large stretch of shoreline in foreground. The Associated Oil Company tanker was empty when it grounded, and was refloated on May 17, 1924. On March 6, 1937, she collided with the President Coolidge in San Francisco Bay, coming to rest near her sister ship, the Lyman Stewart, which had met a similar end on October 7, 1922. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/frankhbuck.html
Steam schooner La Feliz, built in Newhall, WA in 1904 was wrecked in heavy seas off of what is now Natural Bridges State park, about 2 miles north of the Santa Cruz Light Station on October 1, 1924. The ship had picked up a cargo of sardines in Monterey, and was running too close to shore at the time of the accident. View shows vessel from stern listing on rocks while a man at left works with pole. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/lafeliz.html
S.S. Saint Paul, a passenger cargo steamer/barkentine built in 1875 in Philadelphia by William Cramp & Sons. View shows rocks in foreground with onlookers on rocks at left with text on rocks. It was stranded on the rocks near Point Joe near Pebble Beach in dense fog on August 8, 1896. Much of its cargo of livestock and crew were rescued by the passenger steamer Gipsy (see # 907 & 908). http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/stpaul.html
S.S. Saint Paul, a passenger cargo steamer/barkentine built in 1875 in Philadelphia by William Cramp & Sons. View shows ship from starboard. It was stranded on the rocks near Point Joe near Pebble Beach in dense fog on August 8, 1896. Much of its cargo of livestock and crew were rescued by the passenger steamer Gipsy (see # 907 & 908). http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/stpaul.html
S.S. Saint Paul, a passenger cargo steamer/barkentine built in 1875 in Philadelphia by William Cramp & Sons. View shows starboard side of ship being struck by surf. It was stranded on the rocks near Point Joe near Pebble Beach in dense fog on August 8, 1896. Much of its cargo of livestock and crew were rescued by the passenger steamer Gipsy (see # 907 & 908). http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/stpaul.html
S.S. Saint Paul, a passenger cargo steamer/barkentine built in 1875 in Philadelphia by William Cramp & Sons. View shows ship nearing Chinese settlement at Point Joe. It was stranded on the rocks near Point Joe near Pebble Beach in dense fog on August 8, 1896. Much of its cargo of livestock and crew were rescued by the passenger steamer Gipsy (see # 907 & 908). http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/stpaul.html
S.S. Saint Paul, a passenger cargo steamer/barkentine built in 1875 in Philadelphia by William Cramp & Sons. View shows ship from stern, with shoreline in background. It was stranded on the rocks near Point Joe near Pebble Beach in dense fog on August 8, 1896. Much of its cargo of livestock and crew were rescued by the passenger steamer Gipsy (see # 907 & 908). http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/stpaul.html
B & W view of ketch Le Bateau, which ran aground on the evening of July 30, 1969 near Point Pinos. Was hauled ashore on August 1, 1969. View shows coat from bow on rocks.
Color image of ketch Le Bateau, which ran aground on the evening of July 30, 1969 near Point Pinos. Was hauled ashore on August 1, 1969. View shows kelp in foreground, with birds on rocks in midground, and a view onto the boat's deck.
The third Alert on Monterey Bay. She was an iron-hulled, screw steamer, and was laid down in 1873 at Chester, Pennsylvania, by John Roach & Son. She was launched on September 18, 1874, and was commissioned on May 27, 1875, with Commander William T. Sampson in command. http://www.militarymuseum.org/Alert.html
Commercial steam schooner S.S. Crescent City. AKA Jim Butler. Was built in 1906 in Aberdeen, WA, by Lindstrom Shipbuilding Co. Wrecked in fog about 6 miles north of the Santa Cruz Light. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/crescentcity.html
Figurehead from Falls of Clyde on display at San Francisco Maritime Museum. The ship currently is located in Honolulu Harbor. http://www.hawaiiweb.com/oahu/sites_to_see/falls_of_clyde.htm
Four-masted bark Falls of Clyde leaving Hilo, Hawaii for Monterey in 1912. The ship currently is located in Honolulu Harbor. http://www.cr.nps.gov/maritime/nhl/falls.htm
Commercial steam schooner S.S. Celia was built in Benicia, CA by Matthew Turner in 1884. She was wrecked in fog off of Point Joe near Pebble Beach on August 28, 1906. Her cargo was lumber. http://www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov/shipwreck/dbase/mbnms/celia.html
Schooner yacht Shamrock VI. She was blown ashore in Santa Cruz on Saturday, October 7, 1972, and refloated. She sank again while being towed to San Francisco, and refloated again on November 3, 1972.
Steamship on Monterey Bay. Crow's nest on two masts, numerous ship's boats.
Twin screw motor ship Pacific Grove, built in 1928 for Furness, Withy, and Co. in London, England. 450 feet long, accommodates 12 first-class passengers. Prior to WWII, it made regular trips between Liverpool, England and San Francisco, California. Was torpedoed in North Atlantic on April 11, 1943, and sank. Also have copy negative.